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Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

I’m pleased to tell you that the first phase of a collaboration between the Centre for Dispute Resolution and the Li Ka Shing Library is now live on the Library’s website.
The Library has created links to the Centres and Institutes (go to the Library’s front page, and under the “Our Services” tab you’ll see Centres and Institutes. Or go directly to: http://library.smu.edu.sg/subjects/portal_disputectr.asp
We have a project, with them, to facilitate access to information on a wide range of DR topics – much of which information is held in locations other than this Library.
One part of that project is to gather together legal reources relating to mediation – cases, statutes, judicial statements, & official documents. Two RAs (Teng Xiaohui & Thai Zhern Leing) have been working on this and you’ll find the links under the Mediation heading. The first stage is a collection of Singapore links. The next will be Australian federal and state materials; and we’ll continue the journey through English-speaking jurisdictions.
If you have time, do take a look.

I’m pleased to tell you that the first phase of a collaboration between the Centre for Dispute Resolution and the Li Ka Shing Library at Singapore Management University is now live on the Library’s website.

The Library has created links to the Centres and Institutes (go to the Library’s front page, and under the “Our Services” tab you’ll see Centres and Institutes. Or go directly to: http://library.smu.edu.sg/subjects/portal_disputectr.asp

We have a project, with them, to facilitate access to information on a wide range of DR topics – much of which information is held in locations other than this Library.

One part of that project is to gather together legal reources relating to mediation – cases, statutes, judicial statements, & official documents. Two Research Assistants  have been working on this and you’ll find the links under the Mediation heading. The first stage is a collection of Singapore links. The next will be Australian federal and state materials; and we’ll continue the journey through English-speaking jurisdictions.

If you have time, do take a look.

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ADR Singapore

This is advance notice: watch this space, and watch the links on the right of this page. Maxwell Chambers (www.maxwell-chambers.com) is the newly established arbitration “hub” for Singapore, and the home of a range of arbitration agencies and practitioners. Part of its new role has involved taking over the management of the website <adr.sg> formerly managed by the Ministry of Law. The site is due to go live in early September.

Even though Maxwell Chambers is primarily an arbitration body, the site is intended to be an overall portal for DR in Singapore and regionally.

My reason for drawing it to your attention is that there will be a couple of features of the site that mediation and DR practitioners might like to keep an eye on: first, there will be links to resources (web links, articles etc); and second, there will be discussion forums open to academics, practitioners and professionals in the various fields of dispute resolution.

I”ll put up the full link when the site goes live.

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There’s a nice comment in Peter Adler’s Eye of the Storm Leadership, on the nature of conflicts, how they arise, escalate, and how we have or lose the windows of opportunity to deal with them.

They begin with some actual or impending sense of injury: a grievance, a complaint, a sense –- rightfully or wrongfully — of being victimized. Demands are made. When the offers are rejected, threats, bluffs, and brinkmanship ensue. As the fight escalates, matters move to action. People demonize each other. Communication channels sever. People rely on lawyers, handlers, and press agents. Fights ripple outward with unintended consequences and sometimes surprising revenge effects. Others, with or without an immediate stake in the fight, are swept into the vortex. Coalitions form. Battles become more tactical, heated, and fearful. All the while, there are little punctuations and hesitations, moments when the window of a possible resolution opens and closes. Those are what we are listening and scanning for.

In conflict, we see people at their worst. In resolution and reconciliation, we see them at their best. The core matters — creativity, imagination, and forgiveness – – are possible in every conflict. Don’t be put off or sidetracked by emotional intensity. Down below there are solutions that can be excavated.

p.46 -47 of the print version; p.8-9 of the “Into the Fray” section on the CD version.

There’s both a generic and a cultural element to this:

  1. the first is that it’s astonishingly easy to slide into misperception, misapprehension, and – especially – to adopt the victim role in imagined wrongs; and that we can and need to be watchful for the opportunities to open the doors and windows that have been abruptly closed – though there will be times when this doesn’t work; and
  2. the second is that – in addition to the personal, intrapsychic aspects of how and why we slide into conflicts and real or imagined slights – there will be cultural dimensions as to how such events can be managed, not least involving the preservation of face, the use of intermediaries, to greater or lesser role of social norms, the capacity to sever relationships without great social cost (in those more individualistic worlds), and the role and power of alliances.

The intriguing thing about a statement such as this is how disarmingly simple and obvious it is . . . and yet how impossibly difficult it appears at the time.

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While we’re on a roll with new stuff to read and digest, take a look at Joel LEE and TEH Hwee Hwee (eds),  An Asian Perspective on Mediation (Academy Publishing, 2009). For a link to information about the book, go to: http://www.singaporelawwatch.sg/remweb/legal/ln2/rss/legaledu/62127.html?utm_source=rss%20subscription&utm_medium=rss

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A new book has just landed on my desk and it’s already a distraction from the things I really ought to be doing.

Take a look at – and take seriously the core messages in – Chris Honeyman, James Cohen & Giuseppe de Palo (eds) Rethinking Negotiation Teaching: Innovations for Context and Culture (Hamline Univ, DRI Press, 2009).

At the very least the chapters here ask us – challenge us – to re-imagine the ways in which we’ve thought about negotiation and how we teach, train and practise. And this goes wider than the familiar and excellent work that has been done on culture and negotiation, but takes on the implications of new technologies, new working environments and contemporary ethics.

This too is a work in progress and it’s encouraging to see that the project will continue its journey, making its way further East from the US & Europe.

Above all, for me the assumption that is challenged is one that I heard from some highly experienced, excellent colleagues while introducing a negotiation training programme in a Gulf state, that what they – from the US – were bringing to the participants was “global best practice”.

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